Body Image and Comparing: Learn to Stop the Art of Comparing Your Body!

You are a masterpiece

Two weeks ago, I posted a blog about the “stinkin’ thinkin’ ” that happens when we get pulled into the undercurrent of comparing our bodies to other peoples’.  This leads to drudgery and despair because you drown in the pool of stinkin’ thinkin’.  It consumes you until you start the sick cycle of dieting that leads to bingeing, which leads to purging (for some) and over-exercising (for some).  See my posts about the sick cycle for more information.

What would it look like to beat the Body Image Bandit at this comparing game?  After all, coveting – and yes, that is exactly what it is – is a very unhealthy animal.  So let’s work together to stop coveting and comparing.  After all, what good comes out of it?   Here are some techniques to catch yourself at the comparing/coveting game and stopping it right then and there:

1.  Picture a large stop sign.  Picture yourself screaming at the top of your lungs, “STOP!”

 (Warning:  If you do this for real instead of inside your head, people will laugh and point.  So it is best to just picture it inside your head.)  This has really helped a lot of people.  Keep repeating this over and over until it becomes as natural as eating chocolate chip cookie dough when you are baking cookies. 🙂

2.  Stop yourself and ask God to help you. You can’t do it alone. “Whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable- if anything is excellent or praiseworthy – think about such things.”  (Philippians 4:8)  Repeat that verse to yourself, and you’ll shift to an attitude of gratitude.

3. Change channels! Turn from the Stinkin’ Thinkin’ channel to the “Bless others with your gifts,” channel.  Embrace your true gifts, talents, and story. Lean into your true calling, and pursue your passion! How can you embrace your calling and serve instead of obsess about your appearance?

  
Because after all, thinking about the size of your fanny – in relation to the size of other peoples’ fannies – is definitely not a noble thought.  It is a thought of coveting, which leads down to the dark road of depression.  So do yourself a favor, and stop that stinkin’ thinkin’ right in its tracks.

Be kind to yourself, and focus on your God-given talents, abilities to bless others.  Get your focus off your fanny – and those of other people!

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Body Image and Stinking Thinking: Stop Comparing Your Body

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Two weeks ago, I posted a blog about the “stinkin’ thinkin’ ” that happens when we get pulled into the undercurrent of comparing our bodies to other peoples’.  This leads to drudgery and despair because you drown in the pool of stinkin’ thinkin’.  It consumes you until you start the sick cycle of dieting that leads to bingeing, which leads to purging (for some) and over-exercising (for some).  See my posts about the sick cycle for more information.

What would it look like to beat the Body Image Bandit at this comparing game?  After all, coveting – and yes, that is exactly what it is – is a very unhealthy animal.  So let’s work together to stop coveting and comparing.  After all, what good comes out of it?   Here are some techniques to catch yourself at the comparing/coveting game and stopping it right then and there:

1.  Picture a large stop sign.  Picture yourself screaming at the top of your lungs, “STOP!!!!”  (Warning:  If you do this for real instead of inside your head, people will laugh and point.  So it is best to just picture it inside your head.)  This has really helped a lot of people.  Keep repeating this over and over until it becomes as natural as eating chocolate chip cookie dough when you are baking cookies. 🙂

2.  Stop yourself and ask God to help you.  “Whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable- if anything is excellent or praiseworthy – think about such things.”  (Philippians 4:8)  Repeat that scripture to yourself, and your thoughts will be redirected.  Because after all, thinking about the size of your fanny – in relation to the size of other peoples’ fannies – is definitely not a noble thought.  It is a thought of coveting, which leads down to the dark road of depression.  So do yourself a favor, and stop that stinkin’ thinkin’ right in its tracks!

Be kind to yourself, and focus on your God-given talents, abilities, and get your focus off your fanny – and those of other people!

Olympic Ice Dancer Celebrates her Weight Gain! Body Image Buster

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There is no denying that American ice dancer Tanith Belbin is a beautiful woman. As she glides across the ice with partner Ben Agosto, it’s hard to take your eyes off of her. But the Belbin you’ll see take the ice Friday night is very different than the one who won silver at Turin in 2006.

This Belbin is 10 pounds heavier, and she couldn’t be happier about that.

According to the New York Times, Belbin and Agosto went to new coaches, including Natalia Linichuk, in 2008. One of Linichuk’s first suggestions was for Belbin to put on weight. Belbin was resistant, which brought to light Belbin’s problems with eating.

“I thought I was out of control and that the weight gain must be my fault,” she said. “I was like, I’m eating nothing and I’m still not losing weight. I swear, I’m not eating anything and I’m exhausted and cranky and stressed and all of those things that make you gain weight even more.”

With Linichuk’s help, Belbin changed her eating and training habits. She grew stronger, allowing curves and muscles to be a part of her body. Agosto said that their lifts have improved, as Belbin can hold herself up more easily. If you’ve ever held a sleeping child, you know that Agosto’s job became much easier as Belbin’s strength improved.

The difference in their skating is noticeable. Last season, they took silver in Skate America and the Cup of China. This season, they took gold in the same events, and they are contenders for gold in ice dancing. 

So when you watch Belbin compete for gold this weekend, realize that you’re not just looking at a beautiful woman. You’re looking at a beautiful, healthy woman.