Body Image and the Fearless Foursome: Dieting and Bingeing

Dieting has become a rite of passage for teen girls.  I challenge you to find a teenaged girl who hasn’t tried dieting.  Sometimes the dieters lose weight, and other times they don’t.  Either way, they often hurl themselves onto a path of life-long roller-coaster dieting.  Whether the first attempt ends in success or failure, it likely gives them a taste where they long for more.  If they lose weight, they become believers, and if not, they profess to try again and again until they get it “right”.

Just when they begin to feel sure-footed from the triumph of dieting, the ground shifts beneath them, bumping them onto the merry-go-round of self-contempt.   They feel completely deprived, and begin to crave what they’ve started to call bad foods.  This turns them into eating machines.  The hunger wells up within them like a hurricane ready to ravage everything in its path.  They crave  fatty foods and sweet foods and salty foods.  Hunger consumes them.  Food, food, food, is on their minds a great majority of their waking hours and sometimes in their dreams as well.  They’ve opened the floodgates of eternal hunger and will never be the same.  They crave foods they love, as well as foods that they did not used to like before they felt deprived from dieting.

They now feel insatiably starved, which leads to the first all-out binge.  The binge fools their hearts into happiness, but only briefly.  This leads to a free-fall into the shaft of despair and depression, with waves of guilt and shame knocking them into the heart of hopelessness.  Around and around they spin on the merry-go-round of self-contempt, dizzy and depressed from a level of hopelessness they never knew possible.

Research shows the majority of people who lose weight by dieting usually gain it all back, plus more.  So what’s the answer?  Stay tuned for more.

// <![CDATA[Tim.demdexSubmit({pdata:[18109]});// ]]>
// <![CDATA[

(function(){
if( !navigator.cookieEnabled || Tim.getCookie(‘_ls’) === ‘demdex’){
return;
}var map = {‘m12-17′: 19270,’m18-24′: 19253,’m25-34′: 19254,’m35-44′: 19255,’m45-54′: 19256,’m55-64′: 19257,’m65′: 19258,’f12-17′: 19271,’f18-24′: 19259,’f25-34′: 19260,’f35-44′: 19261,’f45-54′: 19262,’f55-64′: 19263,’f65’: 19264},
tags = document.getElementsByTagName(‘meta’),
tag = “”;
len = tags.length;

while(len–){
tag = tags[len];
if(tag.name === “subpagetype” && tag.scheme === “DMINSTR2” && map.hasOwnProperty(tag.content)){
Tim.demdexSubmit({‘pdata’: [map[tag.content]]});
document.cookie = ‘_ls=demdex;domain=.’ + document.domain.split(‘.’).slice(-2).join(‘.’) + ‘;path=/;expires=’ + new Date(new Date().getTime() + 86400000).toUTCString();
}
}
}());
// ]]>

Stop Obsessing about Body Image Issues (and Get On with Life!)

Have you ever wondered how much time you waste per day by thinking about:

  • Do these jeans make my tooshie look big?
  • I need to lose weight!
  • Is that woman (in front of you at the grocery store) thinner or fatter than me?
  • Have I eaten “good” food or “bad” food today?
  • I wish my ____________looked better.

Research shows that when you add all the time together women think about such things, it adds up to  an hour a day.

What if you committed yourself to getting on with your life?  After all,

you weren’t created to obsess about your body!

You have a much higher calling.  So when you waste precious time obsessing about body image issues, you are robbing yourself and the world.

Phil 4:8 encourages us to think positive thoughts. “Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things.”  Phil 4;8 helps me to focus on the positive. 

For example, I’m planning to speak at churches about How to Defeat the Body Image Bandit, using lots of humor, research, and my own story.  I’ll have the churches take up an offering and donate it to organizations that help victims of human sex trafficking.  So instead of focusing on “Do these jeans make my tooshie look fat?” I’m spending my time planning and preparing the speech instead of combing through beauty and fashion magazines, comparing my body to those of photoshopped, concentration camp thin models.  Such a much better use of my time. 

Notice Phil 4:8  does not say:

“Finally, girlfriends, whatever can make your tooshie look sleek, trim, and keep cellulite off your thighs – think about such things.” 

Yet we often live as though we were created to obsess about our bodies.  After all, we’re so good at it!

What if you were to live out your gifts and talents, using your personality and story to become the person you were created to be?  It’s time to stop obsessing about our bodies and get on with our true callings.  You are a unique

masterpiece,

                                    a jewel,

and you were created for a much greater purpose.  So get on with it!

Body Image: Dieting, Bingeing, and Self-Contempt

 Food to Eat to Lose Weight

Dieting has become a rite of passage for teen girls.  I challenge you to find a teenaged girl who hasn’t tried dieting.  Sometimes the dieters lose weight, and other times they don’t. 

Either way, they often hurl themselves onto a path of life-long roller-coaster dieting.  Whether the first attempt ends in success or failure, it likely gives them a taste where they long for more.  If they lose weight, they become believers, and if not, they profess to try again and again until they get it “right”.

Just when they begin to feel sure-footed from the triumph of dieting, the ground shifts beneath them, bumping them onto the merry-go-round of self-contempt.

They feel completely deprived, and begin to crave what they’ve started to call bad foods.  This turns them into eating machines.  The hunger wells up within them like a hurricane ready to ravage everything in its path.  They crave  fatty foods and sweet foods and salty foods.

Hunger consumes them.  Food, food, food, is on their minds a great majority of their waking hours and sometimes in their dreams as well.  They’ve opened the floodgates of eternal hunger and will never be the same.

They crave foods they love, as well as foods that they did not used to like before they felt deprived from dieting.

They now feel insatiably starved, which leads to the first all-out binge.  The binge fools their hearts into happiness, but only briefly.  This leads to a free-fall into the shaft of despair and depression, with waves of guilt and shame knocking them into the heart of hopelessness.

Around and around they spin on the merry-go-round of self-contempt, dizzy and depressed from a level of hopelessness they never knew possible.

Research shows the majority of people who lose weight by dieting usually gain it all back, plus more.  So what’s the answer?  Stay tuned for more.

// <![CDATA[Tim.demdexSubmit({pdata:[18109]});

// ]]>

// <![CDATA[

(function(){

if( !navigator.cookieEnabled || Tim.getCookie(‘_ls’) === ‘demdex’){

return;

}var map = {‘m12-17′: 19270,’m18-24′: 19253,’m25-34′: 19254,’m35-44′: 19255,’m45-54′: 19256,’m55-64′: 19257,’m65′: 19258,’f12-17′: 19271,’f18-24′: 19259,’f25-34′: 19260,’f35-44′: 19261,’f45-54′: 19262,’f55-64′: 19263,’f65’: 19264},

tags = document.getElementsByTagName(‘meta’),

tag = “”;

len = tags.length;

while(len–){

tag = tags[len];

if(tag.name === “subpagetype” && tag.scheme === “DMINSTR2” && map.hasOwnProperty(tag.content)){

Tim.demdexSubmit({‘pdata’: [map[tag.content]]});

document.cookie = ‘_ls=demdex;domain=.’ + document.domain.split(‘.’).slice(-2).join(‘.’) + ‘;path=/;expires=’ + new Date(new Date().getTime() + 86400000).toUTCString();

}

}

}());

// ]]>